Banging on about the Trades

23/10/2014

       

 

It is not uncommon for careers counsellors to   discourage young people from entering manual trades. The transition to computer-based knowledge work over the last 20 or so years has led to an ever-increasing  number of school leavers entering university for such work, leading to a shortage of skilled trades and craftsmen. Dependence on cheap imports in Australia by consumers has reduced demand for tradesmen,  leading to a dramatic reduction in the numbers of available trades courses and teachers of trades.

But the Australian Government projects employment growth in the 5 years to 2018 in Building and Construction at 10.1% and in Machinery Repair and Maintenance at 13.9%! These bright spots in a bleak  employment outlook should encourage job seekers to look closely at these areas. See http://lmip.gov.au/default.aspx?LMIP/EmploymentProjections.

We need to recognise trades as worthy work, capable of offering intellectual challenge and work satisfaction. The gradual disengagement from manual work has de-skilled our workforce, with many knowledge  workers unable to even change a light bulb or adjust their ergonomic chair. 

Scot Weeks (Managing Director)